4.25.2018

Thoughts on Ruffles | Burda 04/2018 #108 Blouse with Ruffles

Can Ruffles be Sporty?
Sarah Liz's April Theme for Make a Garment a Month Challenge was 'Alternative April'.  To make a garment that is 'alternative' for you made me immediately think of this ruffled top I'd spotted in the April 2018 issue of Burda, which by the way can now be viewed in its entirety in Burda's online 'Lookbook'.  Because never, in my whole life have I been a fan of ruffles on me.  On others..... absolutely.... but me.... no.  So a ruffled blouse seemed a pretty good choice to meet this theme.
As I am also participating in the 2018 Burda Challenge, where you make 1 garment a month from a Burda pattern..... in my case my monthly subscription magazine.....this choice of Burda's April 2018 #108 Blouse with Ruffles pattern also met this goal.  Everyone is welcome to participate in these challenges.  There is no sign-up or invitation deadline, just join in if you'd like.
Burda's line drawing shows ruffles at shoulder seams and bottom of sleeves on a boxy top.  No darts, v-neck finished with bias binding and a belt secured by crochet thread loops.
Photo Credit:  BurdaStyle.com
Mine originally turned out like this below.  The shoulder ruffles sort of stood out like 'wings' and was just oh-so-not-me.  Shortly after taking this photo, the seams were unpicked and resewn sans shoulder ruffles.
Much better don't you think!
This the cover shot for Burda's April 2018 issue.  She has the top tucked in and wearing the belt around her neck.  I thought this was a cute look too.  But if you look carefully at the photo, you will see how the top looks all slidey at the shoulders, where one could possibly be constantly yanking the top up from sliding all over the place.  Been there, done that with a few previous makes and I did not want that type of top here.
Photo Credit:  BurdaStyle.com
So after tracing a size 36, I placed the pattern's center back neck @1/2" off the fold line, cocking the pattern back to the fold line, thus narrowing the neckline in the back.  This top fits perfectly with no slipping and sliding around.
Polyester crepe opaque fabric purchased at Hobby Lobby, surprisingly with the print printed sideways.... off grain..... which sort of ruined plans for the original intended purchase to be a dress.  Guess it was meant to be this top as I cannot imagine this top out of any other fabric!  Great care was taken in print placement and I really like the way the print turned out.  Nicely centered down the front and the back.
Just as I began this project, knowing I wanted to sew tiny, narrow hems on the ruffle hems, I had the opportunity to purchase Rolled Hem presser feet for my 'vintage' (mid 1990's) Bernina 1230.  I jumped at the chance and below I am test-driving them the day they arrived.  Foot #62 sews a 2mm rolled hem, #63 a 3mm rolled hem and you guessed it the #66 sews a 6mm rolled hem.
I chose the #62 2mm rolled hem for these ruffles and have to say it was a huge learning curve to get the hang of keeping my slippery, thin, crepe rolling through this assembly to get the proper stitch.  If it rolled out of the hemmer while you are stitching, not catching the 'roll', you had to rip unpick everything and start again.  Am very proud of the tiny hems these ruffles have.
Really love this sleeve!  It has a sort of dropped shoulder leading into the sleeve.
French seams at shoulder and bodice side seams, armscye and sleeve ruffle seams were sewn then serged, hem was blind-stitched hemmed on the machine.  Oh, the neck binding.... how could I forget that.  I don't have a lot of experience binding V-necks but this one turned out very well following Burda's instructions, though it took me a while to figure out exactly what they were trying to tell me what to do.  It's funny because once you 'get' what the instructions are trying to tell you, when constructing a new-to-me technique, it seems so easy and you wonder why it seemed so complex at first.  That was this v-neck binding application.  Since I finished my top, Allison showed a very clear photograph how Burda wants you to pin the binding to the V at the front, so I'll just link to her blog post for you to see.  I trimmed the neckline seam allowance on the pattern to 1/4" before cutting out the fabric so I could pin the binding directly to the neckline's raw edge and it made it easier.
And I have not put in the crochet belt loops yet.  Still deciding if I want them or not.  Right now the belt stays in place nicely without them.  Burda included the instruction for the belt loops with the pattern instructions and I've also found a picture tutorial on the Burda site you can find here.
And how incredibly lucky am I!!!  A very sweet family member surprised me with my very own labels.  She had the printing company download my blog logo to create these for me.  Love!!
So to answer the question from the beginning.... yes, methinks ruffles can be sporty when wearing the Ottobre white pants , tennis shoes and a hat hiding a bad-hair-day, but can see this top easily transforming into a romantic, feminine top with the right skirt and shoes.  Super comfortable, lots of wearable options..... this pattern will definitely be made again!  So maybe I have become a fan of ruffles after all.
The Ox-eye Daisies are in glorious bloom right now.  These are wildflowers that I transplanted to this front island area and they've spread each year.  One of my favorite blooms.
Happy Sewing Everyone!  :)




UPDATED 4.29.2018: Wanted to show this pretty top all dressed up.  Worn to church this morning with the Yoshiko Tsukiori jacket and heavily modified Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt.  Such a versatile top!!

14 comments:

  1. Lovely top.
    Lee, UK.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You made the right decisions with diminuing the neck width and eliminating the ruffle wings and you have got a beautiful little blouse which suits you really well. What a sweet personal label! I think a label complets each garment and you will always know where is the back. Your rolled hem is flawless. It is a technique to be practiced. I had some difficulties first in learning where to take aim the fabric edge and how to feed the foot without stretching the fabric. I hadn‘t the courage purchasing a rolling hem foot with a straight stitch hole. I always have to switch the needle a little. But maybe with such fine fabrics it is better? When there is a mistake, I only unpick the concerned stitches, fold the fabric, press it and stitch without putting the fabric in the screw.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wonder the same about the straight stitch hole on the #62 foot. This sews such a tiny, tiny rolled hem at 2 mm that I wondered if it helped stabilize the fabric to accept the stitch well. The other feet I purchased create wider rolled hems and they do not have that straight stitch hole. Great observation! And thank you for sharing what your technique is. There is definitely a knack to using these feet. And thank you for your kind compliment!!! :)

      Delete
  3. Lisa, this top turned out beautifully! I like it without 'wings' :) I would imagine an extremely floppy fabric is needed to negate the sticky-out effect. I love how you styled your top too. It definitely looks good with your sporty pants, shoes and hat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Diane! You have such great taste it is a wonderful compliment!! :)

      Delete
  4. It's beautiful, Lisa, and that feminine fabric suits you perfectly. I'd say you have a very good grasp of what you like and what looks good on you. Love those daisies too!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Love the the blouse. Such pretty fabric . I agree removing the ruffle, was perfect. Happy sewing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It felt so much better after removing those ruffles. Now it will be easier and much quicker to make again! Thank you Judy!! :)

      Delete
  6. I think this pretty top can be anything you want it to be!! It's gorgeous. Such a fresh pattern, you can't help but feel happy looking at the cheerful colour. So nice with your white pants, too, a picture of sporty prettyness! So there is such a thing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Sarah Liz! What a kind thing to say!! :)

      Delete
  7. I like your version better than Burda's! That fabric is just glorious and I can see this will be a go-to garment for spring and summer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a super nice thing to say Sue!! Thank you ever so much!! :)

      Delete

Thank you for taking the time to leave a note.~Lisa

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...