4.04.2014

a needle-nosed pair of pliers = a necessary supply

My Perfectly Pleasant Peasant blouse was not 'perfectly pleasant' after its first washing.  I knew I'd put the neck binding on backwards, because I modified the pattern as I was putting on the binding, but that wasn't a problem until after its first washing when it frayed all 'round in front where I hadn't caught the top-stitched seam just right.  I'd sewed the binding to the wrong-side first, then top-stitched, folding the raw edges under, to the front.  My fabric was a little wonky to deal with too.
To right my wrongs, clever me thought it'd be a brilliant idea to clip all the frayed areas, then satin stitch using a pretty brown thread overlapping the frayed edges and the original top-stitched seam and it would become a new 'design feature'.  All was humming along quite well, as you can see from the photo below where I started in the back, until for some unknown reason, my machine began 'catching' and the satin stitches began building up.  About the time I figured the top was looking pretty sorry and I was ready to go to plan B, my needle jammed in my machine.  And oh my goodness it was jammed.  After many frustrating minutes, the needle-nosed pliers were absconded from my husband's woodworking bench and my machine was back in working order.
Holding my breath, cut the (already almost too low) entire neck binding off this top and took the time to re-gather the front in a more pleasing look and take the center back seam in a little before cutting a new binding out of my shrinking amount of leftover fabric.  I folded this binding in half, attached it to the right-side first, then top-stitched from the front attaching the back after pinning all in place very carefully.  I think it improved the top, even though it took an entire afternoon, or more counting all the figuring out time. 
By taking up the back, and finagling around with the front gathers, it's not too low after all.
I also took the time to make a few other minor adjustments to some of my other handmade items.  Do you find that after you wear some of your handmade clothes, you can figure out how to adjust the fit better?!

6 comments:

  1. It is such a pretty blouse-I am glad you coukd " make it work".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's funny because I think I like it even better now! Thank you Mary!

      Delete
  2. It's just amazing how much time these "little" repairs can take, isn't it? There are times when (so few people seem to know how to sew anymore and everyone knows I can sew) someone asks me very nicely to just _________ (insert whatever they need modified on a garment) for them and I have to bite my tongue, smile and say, "Sure." Four hours later . . . :o)

    I think it's a wonder any garment either home made or purchased fits any of us. I mean look at all our different shapes!! One size does not fit all even if we've made it from a correctly sized pattern that we can adjust while making it. I think you did a great job of modifying this pretty top of yours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so right, at least for me, I seem to be a 'slow' sewer - nothing is 'automatic' or 'fast', but the learning curve is great and that's a good thing... for me. Thank you Mama Pea!

      Delete
  3. What a frustrating afternoon - but the band looks wonderful - and although a tedious lesson, next time you will know what to do :). Yes, I often find that the first garment is just the start of working out what to do, and how to fit - and the process continues. While the body also continues to change!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 'Frustrating' - Oh Yes! At one point I deliberated on how important this little top was to me! Fit is something I am learning a lot about right now, of which I never had to learn when I sewed for my girls... as they just grew so fast, the 'fit' wasn't a big deal! Great point... 'body changes'!

      Delete

Thank you for taking the time to leave a note.~Lisa

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...